Keep Walkin’: Singles, Demos & Rarities 1965-1978 (Limited Yellow Vinyl 2LP)

Limited Yellow Vinyl 2LP

Light in the Attic continues to celebrate the influential career of singer, actress, activist, and icon Nancy Sinatra with a captivating new collection, Keep Walkin’: Singles, Demos and Rarities 1965-1978. Exploring the lesser-known gems from Sinatra’s rich catalog through 25 B-sides, rare singles, covers, demos, and previously unreleased recordings, Keep Walkin’ was remastered by the Grammy® nominated engineer John Baldwin and available in a variety of formats.

In 1965, 25-year-old Nancy Sinatra scored her first No.1 hit with These Boots are Made for Walkin’, a bold anthem for female empowerment. Brazen, sassy, and utterly infectious, it was a reintroduction of sorts for the eldest daughter of Frank Sinatra, who had been struggling to find a spotlight of her own amid a changing musical landscape. Suddenly, audiences who had initially brushed off Sinatra as too demure or out-of-touch were paying attention. Written and produced by Oklahoma-born songsmith Lee Hazlewood (with swaggering instrumentals, courtesy of Billy Strange and The Wrecking Crew), the song launched the singer’s career, as well as one of music’s most unlikely, yet compelling, creative partnerships.

Over the next decade, Sinatra continued to notch multiple hits on both sides of the Atlantic, including Sugar Town, How Does That Grab You, Darlin?, and a haunting rendition of the Sonny Bono-penned Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down). The singer also paired up with Hazlewood for a series of popular duets (Summer Wine, Jackson, and Some Velvet Morning) and collaborative albums. In between best-selling LPs like Boots (1966), How Does That Grab You (1966), and Nancy and Lee (1968), Sinatra performed the theme song to the 1967 James Bond film, You Only Live Twice, and collaborated with her father on the global chart-topper, Somethin’ Stupid.

Among the highlights is the spritely opener The City Never Sleeps at Night, which served as the B-Side to These Boots Were Made for Walkin’. Overshadowed by the colossal success of its A-side, it’s no surprise that the cinematic tune never had its proper due. Yet, Lea reveals, Hazlewood initially intended to make it the focus single. Another long-lost B-side is The Last of the Secret Agents?, which was paired with the Top 10 hit, How Does That Grab You, Darlin’? The playful song, written by Hazlewood, served as the theme to the 1966 comedy of the same name, in which Sinatra co-starred alongside Marty Allen and Steve Rossi.

Keep Walkin’ also features several choice A-sides that were never included on albums and were overlooked for one reason or another. Among them is 1966’s In Our Time, a rebellious anthem for ‘60s youth, which references drug culture and women’s liberation, among other topics.

The collection also features several outstanding covers, including a previously-unreleased rendition of the Barry Mann / Cynthia Weil classic, I Just Can’t Help Believing (a hit for both B.J. Thomas and Elvis Presley). This 1978 recording, reimagined as a duet, marked one of Sinatra’s brief reunions with Hazlewood, following his abrupt move to Sweden not long after 1972’s Nancy and Lee Again. Another choice track finds Nancy interpreting Neil Diamond’s Glory Road. Released as a single in 1971, it features one of the singer’s most cherished vocal performances.

Tracklisting:

1. The City Never Sleeps At Night
2. The Last Of The Secret Agents
3. My Baby Cried All Night Long
4. Shades
5. In Our Time
6. Love Eyes
7. This Town
8. Tony Rome
9. 100 Years
10. See The Little Children
11. Something Pretty *
12. Do I Hear A Waltz *
13. Drummer Man
14. Zodiac Blues
15. Highway Song
16. Are You Growing Tired Of My Love
17. Flowers In The Rain
18. Glory Road
19. Ain't No Sunshine
20. Easy Evil 
23. Sugar Me
24. Kinky Love
25. Dolly and Hawkeye
26. I Just Can't Help Believing *

* Previously unreleased