M.I.A

Maya

XL Recordings

$42.00
Only 1 left!
or 6 weekly interest-free payments of $7.00 Laybuy What's this?


IN STOCK
Ships next business day.

FREE SHIPPING IN NZ

Maya (stylised as MΛYΛ) is the third studio album by British rapper M.I.A., released on 7 July 2010 on her own label, N.E.E.T. Recordings, through XL Recordings and Interscope Records. Songwriting and production for the album were primarily handled by M.I.A., Blaqstarr and Rusko. M.I.A.'s long-time associates DiploSwitch and her brother Sugu Arulpragasam also worked on the album, which was mainly composed and recorded at M.I.A.'s house in Los Angeles. The album's tracks centre on the theme of information politics and are intended to evoke what M.I.A. called a "digital ruckus"; with the album, elements of industrial music were incorporated into M.I.A.'s sound for the first time. A deluxe edition was released simultaneously, featuring four bonus tracks.

Critics' opinions of the album were generally favourable although divided, with both its musical style and lyrical content each attracting praise and criticism. In its first week of release, the album entered the UK Albums Chart at number 21, becoming her highest-charting album in the UK. It also became her highest-charting album in the US, reaching number nine on the Billboard 200, and debuted in the top 10 in Finland, Norway, Greece and Canada. M.I.A. promoted the album by releasing a series of tracks online, including "XXXO", "It Takes a Muscle" and "Born Free", the latter of which was accompanied by a short film-music video, which generated controversy due to its graphic imagery. She also performed at music festivals in the US and Europe to coincide with the album's release. During her promotion of the album, she became embroiled in a dispute with Lynn Hirschberg of The New York Times.

Track listing:

  1. The Message
  2. Steppin Up
  3. XXXO
  4. Teqkilla
  5. Lovalot
  6. Story To Be Told
  7. It Takes A Muscle
  8. It Iz What It Iz
  9. Born Free
  10. Meds And Feds
  11. Tell Me Why
  12. Space